Publications

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Creating a Human Trafficking Strategic Plan to Protect and Heal Native Children and Youth
May 18, 2015
Children are particularly vulnerable to human trafficking. When dealing with trafficking cases, child safety must guide all efforts: child victims must be protected, physically and psychologically, from their traffickers and provided with placements and services specifically designed to address the trauma they have endured. Because every tribal community is different, it is not possible to create...More
Research Report: Assessing ICWA Compliance in Seattle, WA
May 4, 2015
In response to the high number of Native American children being removed from their homes, Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) in 1978. In 25 U.S. Code § 1902, Congress declared that the best interests of Indian children would be protected by promoting the stability and security of Indian tribes and families through the establishment of minimum standards for removing Indian...More
Reasonable Efforts: A Judicial Perspective
September 23, 2014
Reasonable Efforts: A Judicial Perspective, written by NCJFCJ Past President Judge Leonard Edwards (Ret.), is a new publication made possible by the generous support of Casey Family Programs and Philanthropic Ventures Foundation. From the Foreword by the NCJFCJ Past President Michael Nash, Presiding Judge of the Los Angeles Juvenile Court:   “… Two goals of this book are to encourage judges and...More
DISCLAIMER: Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Facts and Fiction
April 17, 2014
DISCLAIMER: If you downloaded a version of the ICWA Facts and Fiction publication, please discard it, as we have found errors that need to be corrected. We sincerely apologize for the misinformation contained in this document and are working to correct it. More
Measuring Compliance with the Indian Child Welfare Act: An Assessment Toolkit
February 28, 2014
The NCJFCJ is committed to helping state courts achieve full ICWA compliance. A new resource is now available to the courts (or Court Improvement Programs) to help achieve this goal. Measuring Compliance with the Indian Child Welfare Act: An Assessment Toolkit, provides concrete tools and recommendations for the state courts to assess their current compliance with ICWA. The Toolkit identifies...More
Tribal Engagement Strategies: Establishing and Sustaining Connections
October 23, 2013
Meaningful collaboration has been defined as an ongoing process in which “courts and agencies identify and work toward shared goals and activities to increase the safety, permanency, and well-being of children in the child welfare system.” This technical assistance brief provides information on specific strategies employed by individuals, states, and Model Courts and is intended to inspire others...More
Improving Compliance with the Indian Child Welfare Act: A Guide for Juvenile and Family Courts
January 3, 2013
This technical assistance bulletin provides juvenile and family courts with practice recommendations and tools to improve compliance with the letter of the ICWA as well as with the “spirit of the ICWA” through services and supports. The first, most critical and ongoing step is to develop respectful and authentic relationships with tribes to fully implement the ICWA and best serve Native children...More
Revised Active Efforts Principles and Expectations Publication
July 30, 2010
This publication was developed in consultation with the nine federally recognized Tribes of Oregon by the Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Citizen Review Board (CRB) to create a tool to implement the active efforts mandate of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). The following guidelines are offered for use by courts, DHS staff and local CRBs in evaluating whether active efforts have...More
Court Reform and American Indian and Alaskan Native Children:
August 1, 2009
This Technical Assistance Brief, a joint publication of the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) and the NCJFCJ, has found that additional improvements in data collection and collaboration between courts and public agencies are required to better meet the unique needs of American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) children in court dependency cases, and offers additional recommendations...More

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