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Resources

This resource section provides a library of publications developed under the Supervised Visitation Program, and it provides links to additional organizations working in the areas of supervised visitation and exchange and domestic violence.

Library

03/18/10
Report
Resource Guide for Advocates and Attorneys on Interpretation Serv…

These guidelines focus on court interpretation for domestic and sexual violence victims with limited English proficiency

01/18/10
Article
Shared Parenting After Abuse: Battered Mothers’ Perspectives on…

This chapter focuses on the question: what types of shared parenting expectations do battered women have in reference to the men with whom they have a shared history of violence?

11/18/09
Report
Intimate Partner Violence in Immigrant and Refugee Communities: C…

This report examines the issue of intimate partner violence in immigrant and refugee communities in the United States from a variety of standpoints, including the legal rights and practical challenges facing immigrant and refugee victims…

03/18/09
Publication
Advocacy Beyond Leaving: Helping Battered Women in Contact with C…

This guide offers practical suggestions to assist advocates working day-to-day with victims and uses the familiar and concrete framework of woman-defined advocacy to explain advocates’ important role in safety planning when victims are in contact…

03/18/09
Publication
Domestic Violence Programs and Children’s Records: Issues of Co…

The importance of confidentiality in the lives of battered women and their children cannot be understated. Preserving confidentiality for these women and children is central to ensuring their safety and allowing them to regain and…

03/18/09
Report
Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exch…

This discussion paper examines the various types of domestic violence. Domestic violence is a broad category that has come to include many kinds of violence and behaviors within relationships between intimate partners and, in most…

03/18/09
Report
Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exch…

This discussion paper presents a framework for safely and skillfully engaging with fathers who have been or are currently battering their children’s mother. Meeting these goals rests on the approach, as made possible by workers’…

03/18/09
Report
Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exch…

This discussion paper sets forth a framework for working with mothers who have been battered that requires thoughtful engagement with these women. Meeting these goals rests on the approach, as made possible by workers’ knowledge…

03/18/09
Report
Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exch…

This discussion paper reviews six approaches to learning about the quality and impact of supervised visitation practices from participants, staff, volunteers, and community partners. They include: questionnaires, interviews, focus groups, check-ins, case file reviews, and…

Links

Supervised Visitation Specific Information

  • Family Violence and Domestic Relations Program, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
    The Family Violence and Domestic Relations Program (FVDR) of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges is funded by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women to support supervised visitation program communities in their efforts to increase their ability to assist families experiencing domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault, stalking, and dating violence. The FVDR provides communities with training on court-related, collaborative practice issues; tailored consultation on collaborating with the courts; and access to information on best practices for court and community collaboration.
  • Futures Without Violence
    Futures Without Violence (Futures) operates, among other programs, the Children and Families Program that focuses on improving community and system responses to children and their families experiencing domestic violence or child maltreatment. Futures works with domestic violence programs, batterer intervention programs, family and juvenile courts, responsible fatherhood groups, child welfare agencies, supervised visitation centers, and community organizers to influence and form effective collaborations and build partnerships to promote safe and healthy families.
  • Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice
    The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), a component of the U.S. Department of Justice, provides national leadership in developing the nation’s capacity to reduce violence against women through implementation of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Created in 1995, OVW administers financial and technical assistance to communities across the country that are developing programs, policies, and practices aimed at ending domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Currently, OVW administers two formula grant programs and 17 discretionary grant programs, which were established under VAWA and subsequent legislation, including the Justice for Families Supervised Visitation Program.
  • Supervised Visitation Network
    The Supervised Visitation Network (SVN) is an international membership organization of professionals who provide supervised visitation and access services to families. SVN provides services and resources for agencies, individuals, and members, including opportunities for networking, information sharing, and training.

General Domestic Violence Information

These links are provided solely as a convenience to the user. Inclusion of these links is in no way an endorsement of the websites or contents of said websites by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice or the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2015-TA-AX-K023 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this website/publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice or the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.